A Look at the Women’s British Open

Followers of professional golf in the UK have been spoiled for choice of late with a host of big-name tournaments taking place, including The Open Championship in Northern Ireland last month. That was won by Shane Lowry and the champion now hopes his victory will stand him in good stead when it comes to being picked for the 2020 Ryder Cup.

It’s now the turn of the women’s game to shine with the 2019 British Open schedule to take place at Woburn Golf Club, Buckinghamshire between the 1st and 4th of August. This year’s renewal will be the 43rd instalment of the world-famous tournament and it couldn’t have come at a better time with the female game flying. Women’s golf continues to grow in popularity at an incredible rate, gaining more dedicated followers with the passing of each competition.

Players Know What to Expect

This will be the 11th time Woburn has staged the Women’s British Open and that’s great news for both players and those looking to have a bet on the outcome. Many of those in attendance will know just what to expect over the course of the weekend, knowing the challenges that await, while punters have enough in the trends and past form to pick through. It’s hoped past meetings will provide a clue as to how the open will go, nudging us in the direction of a winning bet.

There’s certainly no lack of exciting markets to wager your cash on either. As women’s golf grows in popularity, so too does the betting coverage offered up by bookmakers. You can have your say on the outright winner, first-round leader, a hole in one to be scored, players to make the cut or not, two-ball betting, top 10 finish and even each-way. Go with the favourite or take a chance on a plucky outsider with a big price attached. Each-way betting makes that possible and it also offers a safety net to backers who aren’t fully convinced their selection could win the title outright.

You can get your cash down before a ball has been hit or a club swung in anger or wait until you see how the players are shaping up, what the weather is doing and how the course is looking. With in-play betting you can gamble on the champion or play one of the specials at any stage. Watch the live play closely and if you spot a player looking in a menacing mood, act quickly to back her in play. A bet on the women’s British Open is as exciting in the final few swings as it is before the start.

Bumper Field in Attendance

A field of over 140 players is expected to be in attendance for the Women’s British Open on the opening day of August and that includes the top 15 finishers from last year’s tournament. Those who went close will be back for more and will fancy their chances of improving on an effort that saw them push the champion all the way to the final hole. A strong case could be made for more than 15 players winning on Sunday and that competition is why fans flock to follow women’s golf.

Georgia Hall banked the prize money 12 months ago when showing her rivals the way home. The English player scooped the prize money at Royal Lytham & St Annes with a score of 17 under par, two better than her nearest rival. A sizeable cheque was the reward for a score of 271 and she’s keen for more of the same. She took the prize from South Korea’s In-Kyung Kim who won at Kingsbarns off 270 before that.

A South Korean national has won two of the last four runnings of the Women’s British Open and that’s worth keeping in mind when placing your bets this weekend. The last time the competition was held at Woburn Golf Club we saw Thailand’s Ariya Jutanugarn win with 272 and we’re hoping for another low scoring year. America’s Sherri Steinhauer was best at this course in 1999. South Korea has won more British Open’s than any other country, enjoying six champions to date. That places them ahead of America on three, England on two, Taiwan’s two, and the one won by Australia, Mexico, Scotland, Sweden and Thailand.

Hall Looks Better Following a Break

One player who will be hoping to make a mark in this year’s competition is Georgia Hall who played at the Evian Tournament in France last week. She went into that one aiming for back-to-back majors and told supporters her key to success would be to keep things simple and stick to the basics. The British Open champion may only be 23 years old, but she is already an established name in the sport and is seen, by many, as the future of women’s golf.

There’s a lot of expectations on her shoulders but she seemed to be coping with the pressures well when speaking to the sporting press recently. Hall said she is enjoying a learning curve as she aims to improve on her world ranking, currently sitting at 30. If she continues the form, we have seen from her already this year we have no doubt that number will be cut considerably before the end of 2019.

A big showing here would certainly help her cause and she looks a better player following a brief break. Hall pushed herself hard, back in the winter and spring of this year and she seemed determined to claw her way into the running for major prizes. At the end of a marathon stint, she had the look of a player who had burned herself out. A rest was needed and with that behind her, she appears to be firing on all cylinders again.

Gap in Prize Money

The Women’s British Open made the news on the back of The Open Championship in Northern Ireland due to a sizeable difference in prize money between the two competitions. There are no plans to match the two but the purse for the women’s game was raised by around 40 per cent and that is seen as a move in the right direction.

How can you boost your bank balance at the Women’s UK Open? Bookmakers offer an exciting outright betting market and there are some tasty prices to be had. Georgia Hall is sure to be popular with backers, especially those looking to go with a patriotic punt. Those following the trends can take a look at Brittany Altomare, the 28-year-old American who played well in this competition last year.

If you’d prefer a South Korean interest backers will be drawn to Lyndia Ko. The 22-year-old from Seoul has experience of winning a major, having claimed the ANA Inspiration in 2016 and Evian Championship the year before. Backers are sure to get a run for their money on a woman who was third in this competition a few years ago.